Monthly Archives: May 2010

Nerdy Cute Girls. In T-Shirts

What can I say. It’s Friday, and I’m tired of doing serious stuff. I was telling my wife last week that I miss doing the “cute girl” posts. They bring a lot of bogus and useless traffic which costs me money and I hate, but they’re also mindless and fun. And sometimes mindless and fun is a good thing.

If you can handle a wet t-shirt and some PG-13 language, this entry is safe for work. If you like girls, the whole article will probably be much more entertaining! I went through a lot of girly-nerdy-booby t-shirts on the web trying to find tasteful and cute nerdy examples. What can I say — this is the type of sacrifice I am prepared to make for you, the reader. Which is another way of saying this post has nothing to do with you the reader, it was just the product of a waste of time on a Thursday evening that turned into a blog post.

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Hey! You! Get Off Of My Cloud!

girl with 'no pictures' written on her shirt

Somebody shared a link with me today about the role of dopamine in creativity. So I click the link.

And I am taken to the sign-on page to some place that keeps documents for people. I can view the document online, but if I want to download it, I need to sign-up.

I really wish there wasn’t such a mad scramble on the internet to lay claim to data that I might be interested in.

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The Iron Triangle: God, Suffering, and Death

I enjoy thinking and writing about philosophy, and over the years I have reached a strange conclusion.

There are really only three important metaphysical concepts: God, Suffering, and Death. How each of us deal with these concepts form the basis of our value system.

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Coming to a Computer Near You: The Multi-factor Quiz Show

Many companies are (rightfully) getting very concerned about security on the net. So to make sure you are who you say you are, they use something called “multi-factor authentication” It’s not enough to have a password any more: now they’d like a smartcard, or perhaps you could store the answers to some questions only you would know the answers to. For those of us perhaps a bit on the forgetful side, this is not fun.

So now when I surf the net, it’s like a quiz show. I go to log in to my brokerage account. After the password, they ask “What was the name of your elementary school?”

I don’t know. They changed the name about halfway through my first year. Did I use the original one or the later one?

Visit another site: “What was the name of your favorite pet?”

I had a lot of pets. I really liked my cat WhiteFoot, but FriskyFoot was pretty cool too, and then was that dog Sad Eyes that Joy had…

“Where is your favorite vacation spot?”

The kids like Myrtle Beach, but I’ve always been fond of Maine, but then there was that trip I took about the time I set the account up….

“Who was your best friend growing up?”

Now wait a minute. I had LOTS of friends, thank you very much, and for me to pick one out….

“Where did you meet your wife?” “When is your wedding anniversary?” “Who is your favorite aunt?”

Stupid computer.

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Collaborative Blogging — Bad Agile User Stories

This is my first shot at collaborative blogging — where you, the user, have just as much control over the blog as I do.

I’ll ask the question and you guys respond, both by voting, giving options, and commenting. As things progress, you can send links to other people to join the conversation, add in text, images, video, video conferencing, IM, mindmaps, embed the results in your own blog, or whatever. Whatever you think is appropriate for the topic.

Then you can monitor the changes as other people add their thoughts effortlessly — using the web.

We’re using Google Wave, so if you don’t have it and would like it visit the site or ask for an invite. It’s all web-based (works best in Chrome) and it’s probably the future of something-or-another. That’s kind of what we’re trying to figure out. Not sure, but I think you’re going to need a high-speed connection for this.

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Sprint — can you hear me now?

I am working on-site in North Carolina for a while. The client is large, so they have Wi-Fi available for visiting consultants but it is monitored by the network Nazis. They also have video surveillance of the entire place.

So using the WiFi is an non-starter. I don’t surf porn at work, but I do like to do whatever the hell I feel like on the internet without having people watch and log my actions.

So I plugged up my Sprint modem, got 4 bars on an EVDO connection, and went to town.

Then weird things started happening.

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Ceterum autem censeo, Carthaginem esse delendam

(Note use of Wave for comments at bottom. Feedback appreciated)

I do not believe in evolution.

When I was in fourth grade, my entire class took a break for an hour while I had a debate with my friend David Hillon about evolution. He argued for evolution and science, and I argued for skepticism and faith.

The world, you see, was only a few thousand years old. The Great Flood made the Grand Canyon. There were too many gaps in the fossil record to demonstrate evolution. Great flood stories are part of every culture. After all, we already knew how things came about — the King James Bible — and as long as we understood that was true we could speculate freely about the rest of it.

As long as it supported long-established religious dogma, it was worthy of study.

I have been thinking about my fourth-grade experience and Cato The Elder quite a bit over the last several years.

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