Secret Hacker Bookshelf






I received an email two weeks ago from a guy in the Philippines. He wanted to learn how to program and didn’t know where to start. Last week I was talking to a family member — he wanted to get into computers but didn’t know where to start. This week, 2 people came up to me and asked me questions about which books to read to learn startups and marketing.

It’s a common pattern. On the forum I visit, HackerNews, every few weeks somebody asks the same question — what are the best programming books? What are the best startup books? What are the best books on marketing? There are a lot of people asking, and the same questions are asked quite frequently. A quick search on Google lists dozens of questions about programming.

So. What do hackers recommend to each other?

Frankly, it gets old having to post comments recommending the same books over and over again. I know others feel the same way. But still, I’d like to help. So I decided to take all day today and find the best books from hacker discussions and list them here. Next time somebody asks me, I can just point them to this page. Who knows, if enough folks like the list, maybe I can keep it updated and expand on it.

Caveat Emptor: reading a good book on something fuzzy, like marketing or starting a business, is like having a beer with somebody at a bar. There’s lots of great ideas and great experiences to be learned. It’s also important to note that it’s you, not the authors, who is responsible for your life. Don’t fixate on any one book or author and go off hell bent for leather on what the author said. Instead, sample broadly, compare notes, learn both sides of the argument, then figure out how to use this new information to do things you want to do.

Having said that, this is a pretty incredible list and a pretty cool bunch of recommenders. If you have time, you should follow the conversations around some of these books. Many of the people commenting and many of the people writing these books have made millions or billions of dollars and would like to help you succeed too. And they’re not the traditional get-rich-quick, business porn, or self-help books that clutter up the marketplace. Lots of value here.

These books are listed by how hackers rate them, the vote count — books appearing higher on the list were voted by hackers as better than those lower. The programming section has several sub-sections that I haven’t broken out yet, but you can easily spot where one section ends and another begins.

As for some meta advice, if I were interested in buying one of these books, I’d probably read the pro and con reviews on Amazon, taking careful note of the con reviews (many times the pro reviews are fake). I’ve had pretty good luck using this technique, especially when I get there from a recommendation from a friend. And now you just gained a thousand hacker friends :)

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