Microconf Takeaways

Rob Walling and Mike Taber at the kickoff of microconf 2014

Rob Walling and Mike Taber at the kickoff of microconf 2014

Just had a great time in Vegas with some other small startup guys talking about how to create something that has real value for people — how to help folks in the world. As a side-effect, the goal is to work from home, spending lots of time with your family. It’s no get-rich-quick scheme: everybody has to find their own path. But there are a lot of common things too. Most of us use the internet, most of us either used to program or program now, most of us are part of something called the Micropreneur Academy, and most us, well, are nerds.

Here are the three things I learned (or re-learned) about myself this year:

I don’t know enough about the customer. Yes, I know the job of people I’m helping. Yes, I know the subject area I’m trying to teach. But while I have general and in-depth knowledge, that ain’t cutting it. I need to climb inside my customer’s head, spend time with them doing their work from their point of view, not mine. I keep wanting to jump ahead to the business-building part of things, instead of product-market fit. If I get the right product-market fit, the market will “pull” the rest of the business from me. People will be clamoring at the door demanding that I take their money. If I don’t? Then I’m building something and trying to beat people over the head with it. Don’t do that, Daniel. It hurts.

Hey, I actually know this stuff. Since I’m trying to help people create, maintain, and optimize their to-do lists (backlogs), it would help if I knew what I was talking about. The more I interacted with fellow startup guys, the more I realized that I actually could help these folks too. I’m actually on to something very useful across a broad market. In fact, because book 3 is going to be on backlogs and startups, I can start “eating my own dogfood” and use the things I know in the work I’m doing. It sounds like I am an idiot for not knowing/doing this already, I know. But a lot of times there’s really obvious stuff right in front of you that you miss because you’re in the weeds. Jesse Mecham gave a great talk yesterday about this. He was running a profitable startup for years and still afraid to quit his day job because of his desire for security. It took going to a minister for somebody to convince him he had the answer all along.

Teach more to make more friends. This is one of those things that I understand intellectually, but I don’t think I really get it. Plus, as somebody who took years to learn a few things, I’m seeing these guys become experts in stuff that took a month or two, and then overgeneralizing what they know and saying things that aren’t necessarily true. This makes it tougher on the next guy who comes along who tries to take the reader to the next level. But I understand that taking somebody on a journey of learning with you is good for both of you. I need to keep banging this against my head until it sinks in.

My three action items:

Start talking to people on the phone. Once they sign up for the email course, ask them if they have a few minutes to chat. Get to know why people are interested in learning more about helping Agile teams. There’s no agenda: I’m not trying to sell or push products. Simply trying to gain as much loosely-formatted and unstructured data as possible that I can then go back and find themes and put some structure around.

Use my backlog principles to organize my own startup work. Hey, if the goal here is to complete a series of books that wraps up value creation from customer development to 20,000-person enterprises, time to put the stuff in book 3 to the test personally, instead of just reading about it and watching it. The startup part is probably part of the series I’m weakest on, so nothing like the present to fix that. Not only does this make sense, it’s only an hour or two of work, maybe every month or two. No biggie. (Which is one of the beauties of getting this out to folks, it should take a tough thing and make it much easier)

Revamp my email strategy. Right now I have an Agile Tune-Up email series that runs every week over a period of a year. The purpose is to get to know folks, start a conversation, let them know who I am and that I know some stuff that could help them. That’s about it. I really should 1) offer a free multi-part course or something else of value in return for folks joining the list, 2) re-vamp my weekly series so it’s more useful to the readers, 3) manually test out the emails that go out before I automate the process so that the formatting, message, and timing is exactly what I want, and 4) add in a bit of data around segmentation when people join the list so I can help them better. Are they coaches? Guys working at a big corporation? A startup? I need to create a trial scoring system and hook that into the people I interact with. Powerful idea from Brennan Dunn yesterday. Looking forward to implementing it.

As soon I finish creating the 17 clones I will need to do all of this.

But wait! There’s more! I have a couple of strategic bonus problems that need to be solved right away.

Videos or books? I’m halfway through Backlogs 2, and I only have an early version of the first of eight videos completed for the Backlogs 1 series. Looks like completing either of those two projects should take a solid 3 months. I can’t do both — or rather if it’s possible I don’t understand how. So what to do? Finish the video series so that folks can have the hard-nosed, detailed, deep-dive down on personal and team backlogs after they finish the first book? Or go ahead and continue the story with Smith and the plant, giving people more entertainment — perhaps even finishing the final book — then swinging back for the videos? Maybe neither? Maybe I just stop now and go start marketing the hell out of the book I’ve already completed. Beats me, and I’m the one supposed to be figuring this stuff out.

All-in-all, it was a great conference. Lots to think about, great folks, and some terrific tactical advice that I didn’t even get into here. Good stuff.

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